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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12128/20336
Title: Towards water-soluble [60]fullerenes for the delivery of siRNA in a prostate cancer model
Authors: Korzuch, Julia
Rak, Monika
Balin, Katarzyna
Zubko, Maciej
Dulski, Mateusz
Głowacka, Olga
Musioł, Robert
Serda, Maciej
Madeja, Zbigniew
Keywords: cancer; chemical biology; chemistry; drug discovery; medicinal chemistry; nanomedicine; nanoscience and technology; siRNA; water-soluble [60]fullerenes; prostate cancer
Issue Date: 2021
Citation: "Scientific Reports" (2021), Vol. 11, art. no. 10565, s. 1-9
Abstract: This paper presents two water-soluble fullerene nanomaterials ( HexakisaminoC60 and monoglucosamineC60, which is called here JK39) that were developed and synthesized as nonviral siRNA transfection nanosystems. The developed two-step Bingel–Hirsch reaction enables the chemical modification of the fullerene scaffold with the desired bioactive fragments such as d-glucosamine while keeping the crucial positive charged ethylenediamine based malonate. The ESI–MS and 13C-NMR analyses of JK39 confirmed its high Th symmetry, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the presence of nitrogen and oxygen-containing C–O or C–N bonds. The efficiency of both fullerenes as siRNA vehicles was tested in vitro using the prostate cancer cell line DU145 expressing the GFP protein. The HexakisaminoC60 fullerene was an efficient siRNA transfection agent, and decreased the GFP fluorescence signal significantly in the DU145 cells. Surprisingly, the glycofullerene JK39 was inactive in the transfection experiments, probably due to its high zeta potential and the formation of an extremely stable complex with siRNA.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12128/20336
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-89943-5,
ISSN: 2045-2322
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