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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12128/8322
Title: The Role of Winter Rain in the Glacial System on Svalbard
Authors: Łupikasza, Ewa
Ignatiuk, Dariusz
Grabiec, Mariusz
Cielecka-Nowak, Katarzyna
Laska, Michał
Jania, Jacek
Luks, Bartłomiej
Uszczyk, Aleksander
Budzik, Tomasz
Keywords: precipitation; glacier dynamics; winter rain; mass balance; Hansbreen; Arctic; rain-on-snow
Issue Date: 2019
Citation: Water, Vol. 11 (2019), Art. No. 334
Abstract: Rapid Arctic warming results in increased winter rain frequencies, which may impact glacial systems. In this paper, we discuss climatology and precipitation form trends, followed by examining the influence of winter rainfall (Oct–May) on both the mass balance and dynamics of Hansbreen (Svalbard). We used data from the Hornsund meteorological station (01003 WMO), in addition to the original meteorological and glaciological data from three measurement points on Hansbreen. Precipitation phases were identified based on records of weather phenomena and used—along with information on lapse rate—to estimate the occurrence and altitudinal extent of winter rainfall over the glacier. We found an increase in the frequency of winter rain in Hornsund, and that these events impact both glacier mass balance and glacier dynamics. However, the latter varied depending on the degree of snow cover and drainage systems development. In early winter, given the initial, thin snow cover and an inefficient drainage system, rainfall increased glacier velocity. Full-season winter rainfall on well-developed snow was effectively stored in the glacier, contributing on average to 9% of the winter accumulation.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12128/8322
DOI: 10.3390/w11020334
ISSN: 2073-4441
Appears in Collections:Artykuły (WNP)

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